Neighbourhood Watch - Previous Messages

12 February 2021 - Bitcoin-Related Scam Emails


We’re warning the public to be vigilant of unsolicited emails promoting cryptocurrency (Bitcoin) investment opportunities. We’ve received over 750 reports this week about Bitcoin-related phishing emails that use fake celebrity endorsements to try and lure victims into investment scams. The links in the emails lead to fraudulent websites that are designed to steal your money, as well as personal and financial information.

How you can protect yourself:

  • Investment opportunities: Don’t be rushed into making an investment. Remember, legitimate organisations will never pressure you into making a transaction on the spot.

 

  • Seek advice first: Speak with a trusted friend or family members, and seek independent professional advice before making significant financial decisions.

 

  • FCA register: Use the Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA) register to check if the company is regulated by the FCA. If you deal with a firm (or individual) that isn’t regulated, you may not be covered by the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) if things go wrong and you lose your money.

 

 

  • Report suspicious emails: If you have received an email which you’re not quite sure about, you can report it to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service by forwarding the email to - report@phishing.gov.uk


To see examples of the Bitcoin-related phishing emails that have been reported to us, follow Action Fraud on Twitter or Facebook.

17 February 2021 - Doorstep Sellers


We have taken a report that there has been a male in the WEST COMMON GARDENS area, over the past few weeks, going door to door, trying to sell cleaning products to people on their doorsteps.


The male is not a genuine doorstep seller.  Please remain vigilant.


Before you answer the door, stop and think, are you expecting anyone? Make sure your rear and side doors leading outside are locked if you do answer the door.
Open the door and leave the chain on or talk through a window instead if you can.
Always check for ID. Genuine callers will always have identification and will not mind you asking to see it.
If you do not feel comfortable then do not answer the door!


If you are concerned then please contact the Police on 101 or 999 in an emergency.


Rural Safety & Crime Prevention Guide

 

A handy guide is available to read on line or download on the Crime Prevention Guides page

 

A copy of the Humber Resilience Forum's booklet Life is not always predictable - Let's Get Ready for the Unexpected is availble to download here.  Copies are also available at the village shop for anyone who does not have internet access. So, if you know of anyone who does not have internet access please let them know where they can get a copy or get one for them and pass it on.  Thank you for your co-operation with this.

 

Criminals are exploiting the COVID-19 pandemic to try and get their hands on your money and personal information. To date, Action Fraud has received reports from 2,378 victims of Coronavirus-related scams, with the total losses reaching over £7 million.

How you can protect yourself from Coronavirus-related scams:

There are some simple steps you can take that will protect you from the most common Coronavirus-related scams. Here’s what need to do:

1 - Watch out for scam messages
Your bank, or other official organisations, won’t ask you to share personal information over email or text. If you receive an email you’re not quite sure about, forward it to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS): report@phishing.gov.uk

2 - Shopping online
If you're making a purchase from a company or person you don't know and trust, carry out some research first, for example, by checking to see if others have used the site and what their experience was. If you decide to go ahead with the purchase, use a credit card if you have one, other payment providers may not provide the same protection.

3 - Unsolicited calls and browser pop-ups offering tech support
Never install any software, or grant remote access to your computer, as a result of a cold call. Remember, legitimate organisations would never contact you out of the blue to ask for financial details such as your PIN or full banking password.